[ KINDLE ] ✽ Lexington and Concord: The Beginning of the War of the American Revolution Author Arthur Bernon Tourtellot – Moi-sosedi.info

Lexington and Concord: The Beginning of the War of the American Revolution Lexington and Concord by Arthur Tourtellot provides an in depth look at the skirmishes that started the American Revolution and the forces that were responsible for bringing them about Never going into voluminous detail, but still keeping an agile view of how the events are interconnected, the reader gets a great view of how the events of the revolution were pushed forward by the Sons of Liberty Despite the conciliatory nature of Gage and the British up until the point of the battles it would Lexington and Concord by Arthur Tourtellot provides an in depth look at the skirmishes that started the American Revolution and the forces that were responsible for bringing them about Never going into voluminous detail, but still keeping an agile view of how the events are interconnected, the reader gets a great view of how the events of the revolution were pushed forward by the Sons of Liberty Despite the conciliatory nature of Gage and the British up until the point of the battles it would be the determination of Sam Adams and his cohorts that would push the field so that tensions would flare and boil over While it will never be possible to know who fired first from the Americans or the British as the author points out it did not matter The course for war had been set and this kicked off the events that would force the delegations at the continental congress to begin their plodding actions towards war and independence For those looking for a high level overview with a little detail this is a great book If you want a list of every solider and how it affected their lives you will need to look elsewhere This is a great companion for any military history collection or those interested in the American Revolution April 19, 1775 A turning point in the American colonies relationship with the mother country British soldiers entered the town of Lexington, Massachusetts, and engaged in a face off with members of the local militia No one knows who, but a shot rang out When the ensuing smoke cleared, eight colonials lay dead, 11wounded, and pandemonium reigned across the Lexington green The occasional scrape or scratch aside, the redcoats were unharmed and continued on their way to their primary tar April 19, 1775 A turning point in the American colonies relationship with the mother country British soldiers entered the town of Lexington, Massachusetts, and engaged in a face off with members of the local militia No one knows who, but a shot rang out When the ensuing smoke cleared, eight colonials lay dead, 11wounded, and pandemonium reigned across the Lexington green The occasional scrape or scratch aside, the redcoats were unharmed and continued on their way to their primary target neighboring Concord, where they would receive orders to conduct a house to house search for contraband weapons and ammunition The reception in Concord was very different At North Bridge, a confrontation with some 400 militia farmers, from Concord and neighboring communities, shots again rang out, as soldiers once again killed two of their own people this time, though, a colonial commander gave the order to return fire Two soldiers were killed, eightwounded, and, in doing so, an act of treason committed The American Revolution had begun Originally published under the title, WILLIAM DIAMOND S DRUM, Arthur B Toutellot s narrative provides rich detail on the first day of real change in the American colonies Toutellot has done his homework, relying on old records as far back as eyewitness recollections, but incorporating later material that shedlight on these historic events The writing is clear, straightforward, substantial, and, by all accounts, the best available account on the battles of Lexington and Concord In April1775 Patriot Sam Adams felt the revolutionary movement had reached a stalemate, and realized that he would have to wait for an event to change the feelings of the people On April 19, 1775 Governor General Thomas Gage sent a regiment of 700 plus British soldiers to march to Concord to seize and destroy hidden ammunition and other military stores of the colonists On the way they were to arrest Sam Adams and John Hancock, chief rabble rousers and antagonists for the revolutionary cause T In April1775 Patriot Sam Adams felt the revolutionary movement had reached a stalemate, and realized that he would have to wait for an event to change the feelings of the people On April 19, 1775 Governor General Thomas Gage sent a regiment of 700 plus British soldiers to march to Concord to seize and destroy hidden ammunition and other military stores of the colonists On the way they were to arrest Sam Adams and John Hancock, chief rabble rousers and antagonists for the revolutionary cause The provincial militia were mustered to the Lexington Common, shots were fired, many Americans were killed at Lexington Thus began the American War For Independence Sam Adams had finally gotten his event Many myths are dispelled, credit given where it was due on both sides An interesting read Several local maps depicting the progress of the action It was interesting to read how quickly word traveled in the 18th century, and how gossip and rumor and careful propaganda fueled the Patriot cause This is an excellent book on the beginning of the Revolutionary War As a non history reader, I am addicted now to American History Our history is so rich and exciting We seldom approach this subject as a great story, but it is one of the best. A fascinating and accurate human portrayal of the events surrounding Lexington and Concord The author does a wonderful job researching the entire ordeal and provides a description devoid of fantastical, deity like individuals who possess an immense and prescient self awareness of their actions The best example of this is the author s description of Paul Revere s famous ride The author does an excellent job of providing multiple theories on thoughts of individuals and, while utilizing the writ A fascinating and accurate human portrayal of the events surrounding Lexington and Concord The author does a wonderful job researching the entire ordeal and provides a description devoid of fantastical, deity like individuals who possess an immense and prescient self awareness of their actions The best example of this is the author s description of Paul Revere s famous ride The author does an excellent job of providing multiple theories on thoughts of individuals and, while utilizing the writings of those involved for guidance, simultaneously offers other reasons or causes of events I highly recommend reading this book for anyone who 1 desires a well researched and reasoned approach to American history, and 2 is interested in how vitally important the use of information and misinformation is in achieving political goals Lexington and Concord covers the familiar ground and the battle road well enough.A casual student of the Revolutionary War will recognize most of the elements of the story.A serious student or historian will appreciate Tourtellot s energetic investigation of the motivations of some of the principal players on April 19, 1775, including Samuel Adams, John Hancock, Capt John Parker, and Lt Col Francis Smith.Here s the scoop Tourtellot all too plainly suggests that Samuel Adams convinced Capt Lexington and Concord covers the familiar ground and the battle road well enough.A casual student of the Revolutionary War will recognize most of the elements of the story.A serious student or historian will appreciate Tourtellot s energetic investigation of the motivations of some of the principal players on April 19, 1775, including Samuel Adams, John Hancock, Capt John Parker, and Lt Col Francis Smith.Here s the scoop Tourtellot all too plainly suggests that Samuel Adams convinced Capt Parker to line his men up on the Lexington green so the British soldiers could shoot at them, and start the Revolutionary War.Of course, I m using my own words here to paraphrase the author s obvious intention in Lexington and Concord to put a Machiavellian spin on the story every schoolgirl knows Parker and his militia men technically, they weren t Minutemen bravely showed up and stood their ground to protect their town even though they were outnumbered 10 to 1 by the British regulars, who viciously fired first and killed 10 of the patriots on the field.One might think that Tourtellot s explicit application of tarnish to the Lexington story is mean spirited and unthinkable It is pretty well established that Parker initially had no bloodthirsty inclination to put his men in harm s way.One might also think that Sam Adams manipulation of Parker who was subject to Adams authority is all too thinkable.Readof my book reviews and poems here www.richardsubber.com I really wanted to give this book a 3.5 starts, but unfortunately Goodreads doesn t allow for that It is a great piece of history that I enjoyed reading about, however unlike some of the other historians that I have read on this subject, this particular author is very dry in his telling of the story He was muchworried that we know ever single person that was there and involved in some way, no matter how minor their story was than telling us the significance of the actions being portrayed I really wanted to give this book a 3.5 starts, but unfortunately Goodreads doesn t allow for that It is a great piece of history that I enjoyed reading about, however unlike some of the other historians that I have read on this subject, this particular author is very dry in his telling of the story He was muchworried that we know ever single person that was there and involved in some way, no matter how minor their story was than telling us the significance of the actions being portrayed In other words, he did not figure out how to tell us this huge piece of history like a storyteller In either case, it was worth reading and one of the only books that really focuses on this particular piece of the historical events Mr Tourtellot S Book Is The Best Account We Have Of The Day Of Lexington And Concord The Actions Of Each Individual Who Played A Conspicuous Part In The Day S Work Are Minutely Traced But Mr Tourtellot Never Loses The Main Thread Of His Narrative And The Wealth Of Detail He Has Included Gives Substance And Color To An Exciting Story JC Miller, New York Herald Tribune Book Review Im biased for having grown up in Lexington, which gave me the advantage of being able to picture the landscape, but this book is awesome The level of detail about what happened April 19, 1775 is mind blowing I couldn t put it down. Clear, concise of events leading up to the battle and immediate consequences there of Good read.


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